Image

It’s been a while since I last posted; six months, to be exact. What can I say – A combination of blogger’s block and killer consulting hours.

Whether it’s a new organizational structure, a superior operating model or an upgraded SAP solution, people tend to resist change. As a Change Manager, you are further hampered in this task of managing change by the fact that people are different. What deeply impresses Mr. A and motivates him to change may have no effect whatsoever on Ms. B.

Hence, if you are going to develop a change management strategy – with the intention of managing change in your organization – then you’d better start with what motivates people in the first place.

The ‘’Social Style’’ Model, created by the TRACOM Corporation, divides people into four basic styles. You can discover which social style you fall into by answering these two questions.

Think back to the time when you are most yourself and most comfortable. Then:

  1. Are you happier when you are working at a fast pace with a high-energy level or when you are working at a slower pace, taking your time?
  2. Are you happier when you are working with people or with ideas?

If you like to work fast and with ideas, you are a Driver.

If you like to work slow and with ideas, you are Analytical.

If you like to work fast and with people, you are Expressive.

If you like to work slow and with people, you are Amiable.

I’ve included brief descriptions of each Social Style below so you can confirm your results:

See also  How to Collaborate for Effective Change

Image

If you like to work fast, and with ideas, then you are a Driver. On your best day, you deliver results, produce actions, are organized and provide leadership. On your worst day, however, you are autocratic and people insensitive. You don’t care what others think. You aren’t sociable, don’t listen and are too impatient. This social style predominates in the Boardroom, the C-suite or wherever major decisions about the Company’s future are made.

Image

If you like to work slowly and with ideas, then you are Analytical. On your best day, you don’t pressure or become salesy. You can show how. You provide rigor. You are transparent and comprehensive. On your worst day, you are unsociable and withdrawn. You can be tedious. You are into too much detail. You won’t take risks and you are indecisive. This social style predominates in Research and Development, Finance and Accounting, Strategy or wherever precision and analysis are called for.

Image

If you like to work fast, and with people, then you are Expressive. On your best day, you are enthusiastic. You are social and likeable. You are innovative and creative. You provide humor. On your worst day, you talk too much & dominate meetings. You are too salesy. You tell long stories where you are the hero. You don’t listen. You make decisions too quickly and you say things that you later regret. This social style is found predominantly in the Sales and Marketing Department, or wherever persuasion and people skills are called for.

Image

If you like to work slowly and with people, then you are Amiable. On your best day, you provide harmony and consensus. You settle things down. You provide comfort. On your worst day, you won’t initiate things that must be done. You won’t make decisions on your own. You won’t take risks. This social style predominates in Human Resources or wherever staff welfare and people’s concerns are being catered to.

See also  Top 5 Strategies for Changing a Driving Stakeholder

So, which is your Social Style?

In reading these posts, I bet you discovered not only your style, but the style of your colleagues, supervisors and friends. This just goes to show that everyone is different. Hence, the best strategy for motivating a Driver to change will not succeed in motivating an Analytical.

I intend to do justice to this series on Social Styles and Change in the upcoming weeks, so watch this space!

By Comments off June 15, 2013